Should folliculitis be referred to a specialist?

The patient’s primary care provider can usually diagnose and treat uncomplicated cases of folliculitis, but for those cases that are persistent or result in scarring, a dermatologist should be consulted.

Who do I go to for folliculitis?

It can be helpful to see a dermatologist to make sure you have folliculitis. The infected hair follicles can look like another skin condition, such as acne. A board-certified dermatologist can tell you whether you have folliculitis and give you tips to help clear it.

When should you see a doctor for folliculitis?

Call your doctor if you have folliculitis and: It spreads or keeps coming back. You have a fever over 101°F (38°C). The affected area becomes red, swollen, warm, or more painful.

Is folliculitis something to worry about?

The condition isn’t life-threatening, but it can be itchy, sore and embarrassing. Severe infections can cause permanent hair loss and scarring. If you have a mild case, it’ll likely clear in a few days with basic self-care measures.

How do dermatologists treat folliculitis?

For mild infections, your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic cream, lotion or gel. Oral antibiotics aren’t routinely used for folliculitis. But for a severe or recurrent infection, your doctor may prescribe them. Creams, shampoos or pills to fight fungal infections.

What happens if folliculitis doesn’t go away?

If folliculitis goes untreated it may result in serious or deep infections that may spread or cause permanent scarring, cellulitis, or even enter the bloodstream and become life-threatening. Each hair on your body grows out of a pocket in your skin called a follicle.

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Can you get folliculitis on your pubic area?

Vaginal folliculitis, or genital folliculitis, is very common and can occur on and off throughout your lifetime. Folliculitis looks like acne in the genital region. The main difference is that acne is a clogged or infected pore, while a folliculitis bump is actually an infected hair follicle.