Is there an association between alopecia areata and systemic lupus erythematosus a population based study?

To conclude, a significant positive association was observed between AA and SLE. Further longitudinal observational studies are necessary to establish these findings in other study populations.

Is alopecia areata linked to lupus?

It is more commonly seen with thyroid disorders and vitiligo, but alopecia areata has also been linked to diabetes, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Indeed, individuals with alopecia areata have an increased risk of developing systemic lupus erythematosus.

Is alopecia common with lupus?

Unfortunately, yes. Lupus causes widespread inflammation that usually involves your skin — particularly on your face and scalp. Lupus can cause the hair on your scalp to gradually thin out, although a few people lose clumps of hair. Loss of eyebrow, eyelash, beard and body hair also is possible.

Is autoimmune disease related to alopecia?

Alopecia areata frequently occurs in association with other autoimmune disorders such as vitiligo, lichen planus, morphea, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, pemphigus foliaceus, atopic dermatitis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, hypothyroidism, endemic goiter, Addison’s disease, pernicious anemia, lupus erythematosus, diabetes …

What autoimmune disease can cause alopecia?

Among the autoimmune diseases that can lead to some form of hair loss are:

  • Alopecia areata.
  • Alopecia Universalis.
  • Lupus.
  • Hashimoto’s disease.
  • Graves’ disease.
  • Crohn’s disease.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Psoriasis.

What are the typical signs and symptoms of autoimmune diseases using lupus as an example?

The most common signs and symptoms include:

  • Fatigue.
  • Fever.
  • Joint pain, stiffness and swelling.
  • Butterfly-shaped rash on the face that covers the cheeks and bridge of the nose or rashes elsewhere on the body.
  • Skin lesions that appear or worsen with sun exposure.
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Is lupus an autoimmune condition?

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), is the most common type of lupus. SLE is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks its own tissues, causing widespread inflammation and tissue damage in the affected organs. It can affect the joints, skin, brain, lungs, kidneys, and blood vessels.